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  • Photojournalism Fall 2022: Student Photography Gallery

    Photojournalism Fall 2022: Student Photography Gallery
    • Photojournalism Fall 2022: Student Photography Gallery

    • Wellness Wednesday: Two Sides to Every Story

      ​Two sides of the same coin.  Two sides to every story.   

      Our strengths are often our weaknesses. When we are determined and stubborn and committed to follow through on a task, it is a strength. We rock! We can do it! When we continue on a path that is tearing us apart, wreaking havoc on our sleep or psyche, this may be a strength overplayed into a weakness – of not being able to stop, let go or find a new path.

      (Note: *This advising tale is not an exact story, more an amalgamation of several recent student stories. Details have been changed to protect their identity.)

      I was talking with a student (*Ann) yesterday who was struggling with Biology, and she was also really committed to pursuing a career in a health occupation. Ann and I have talked a few times and she was dedicated to good study habits – meeting with a tutor, doing academic coaching, using flashcards and participating in a study group. This last visit she was just bummed. She was less stressed this visit, and more resigned to the fact that this Bio course would not work out well.  

      Amidst the discussion of disappointment and “what now?” was her sheepish question of “can I change my major?” (As an advisor, I’m here to support you in meeting your goals, though yes, I’d like to see you graduate with a degree.) My reply was, “yes, you can, what are you thinking of…”

      This is when the conversation shifted away from the mindset of wondering how to not fail this specific class, and what if that does happen, what would that mean for this application and can this class be retaken, and started focusing on other thoughts; what about if I did ____? Are there any courses in _____ next term? I’ve always wanted to learn more about ___ !

      The air, the hope, the look in her eyes — it all changed. 

      This was all visible within 30 minutes, though likely she had had days and weeks of thought and worry. From disappointment in not achieving the first goal, to excitement in a new future possibility. Two sides of change.

      Image by storyset on Freepik

    • Civil Discourse Op-Ed: Gas-Powered Vehicles

      The Civil Discourse Program, facilitated by Communications professor Mark Urista, has yet again taken on a relevant and debatable issue: banning gas-powered vehicles. With California’s recent steps towards banning gas-powered vehicles, should Oregon follow suit? While it seems like an environmentally-conscious decision, how will the power grid be threatened? What would this mean for the working class? The Civil Discourse Program covers all the angles.

      Ban Gas-Powered Vehicles

      Authors: Cheyanne Rider, Eliana Ortega, and The Civil Discourse Program

      California recently passed a ban on the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035. Oregon and other states are considering following suit. This may seem like a drastic change in a short time period but it’s a necessary change. There are several benefits to making the switch to electric passenger vehicles.

      First, this policy will decrease pollution.  Fossil fuels are the biggest contributors to climate change.  This includes coal, oil, and gas that emit carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.  These gasses can cause a variety of health issues like heart attacks, respiratory disorders, stroke, asthma, and even death.  Gas-powered cars don’t just add to the burning of fossil fuels but also cause noise pollution.  We carry a normal conversation at 60 decibels (dB), but trucks and motorcycles can cause noise between 90-96 dB.  Any sound above 65 dB can cause an increase in blood pressure, heart rate, and stress hormones. This affects mental health and can cause cognitive problems.

      Second, this policy can reduce our dependence on foreign oil.  In 2021, the United States imported about 8.47 million barrels per day of petroleum from 73 countries. Our dependence on foreign oil has influenced foreign policy for generations. The war between Russia and Ukraine is only the most recent example of how our daily lives (and wallets) are impacted.  Since the war began, the US has blocked Russian imports of oil causing gas prices to rise. This has led President Biden to release oil from strategic reserves and consider lifting sanctions on Iran. These instances have led to bipartisan support for reducing our dependence on foreign oil. In today’s political climate, that kind of cooperation demonstrates how dire the situation really is.

      Common concerns about electric vehicles are their longevity and affordability.  Electric car batteries are designed to last as long as the car’s life span.  Many manufacturers offer warranties to replace a battery if needed.  Therefore, the battery should not be an issue.  Data also shows that electric cars are becoming less expensive.  There are many inventions in history whose costs have gone down with popularity.  VCR’s are a great example of an item that was extremely expensive when it first became available but the price continued to drop the more popular it became.  Charging stations are also easy to find.  Whether you prefer to use an app or do a quick Google search, anyone who needs a charge should be able to find one. 

      There are many reasons that we should switch to electric vehicles. They can mitigate a significant contributor to global warming, improve our health, and reduce our dependence on foreign energy. This would benefit our environment and have long-lasting benefits for future generations.  


      Don’t Ban Gas-Powered Vehicles

      Authors: Eagle Hunt, Jacob Pacheco, and The Civil Discourse Program

      Banning the sale of new gas-powered vehicles seems well-intentioned.  It will encourage more drivers to purchase Electric vehicles (EVs), lower carbon emissions, and help fight climate change.  In reality, this ban would harm our environment, threaten our power grid, and will negatively affect the working class. 

      EVs are attractive because they produce no carbon emissions.  However, there is one big question that needs to be answered: Where will we get our electricity to charge the EVs?  In California, a state that recently passed a rule that will ban the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035 and aims to issue a similar ban on the sale of new diesel trucks by 2040, 50% of their electricity comes from burning natural gases. Basic chemistry tells us that every time you convert one type of energy into another, you lose efficiency.  If we’re so concerned about the environment, why would we burn gas, convert it to electricity, charge a car, and drive the car, all to avoid putting gas directly into the car?  This process is far less efficient than what we’re currently doing.

      It is also worth looking at our power grid and seeing if it’s up for the challenge of charging a large number of EVs. CA’s power grid is barely sustaining current demand. The US power grid has been described as “aging and unstable.”  Consider how much stress the grid takes when wildfires and heat waves continue to damage outdated equipment.  Adding more EVs without updating our power system will cause it to crash.  Nobody benefits from that result.

      We also need to consider the impact this ban will have on truckers.  Diesel engines are the backbone of our supply chain, construction, farming, and first responder vehicles. A battery simply cannot compete with the durability, strength, and power a diesel engine can produce.  Before any bans on diesel vehicles take effect, we need to have proven, affordable, and accessible replacements ready to go.

      Finally, we must consider the costs of this ban.  New EVs cost about  $17,000 more than gas-powered vehicles.  This barrier is very difficult to overcome.  The average cost for a new gas-powered vehicle is already a lot to afford for working-class families.  When you factor in repairs, EVs can be very expensive to fix once they break down.  At a time when inflation is rampant and 60% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, creating higher costs for personal transportation is harmful and unwise.

      EVs are a remarkable technological advancement and offer many perks.  However, we should be careful about forcing drivers to be fully dependent on them.  A strict ban on gas-powered vehicles by 2035 and diesel trucks in 2040 will also increase costs for many people and presents a serious threat to our power grid.  Moreover, the current process of creating electricity is not carbon neutral.  The US, and Oregon in particular, should be wary of following in CA’s footsteps.

      Image by rawpixel.com on Freepik

    • Roadrunners Rally to Win Back-to-back NWAC Volleyball Championships

      LAKEWOOD, Washington — The Linn-Benton Volleyball team claimed its second-straight NWAC Volleyball Championship after a five-set victory over Columbia Basin in an incredible match on Sunday, Nov. 20, at Pierce College.

      After winning their first-ever NWAC title in 2021 led by head coach Jayme Frazier, the Roadrunners have now won back-to-back titles in dominant fashion. LBCC finished 2021 with a 32-2 record but managed to improve upon that with a 34-1 record in 2022.

      A rarity on the season, the Roadrunners went down 2-1 in the match due to the tough play of the Hawks. In set four, however, LBCC collected themselves to tie the score with 25-20 set win. In the fifth and final set, it was all Roadrunners as they went up 9-1, eventually finishing the thrilling match with a 15-5 set score.

      The Roadrunners took set one by a 25-15 score as their front row caught fire, recording five blocks with a number of unstoppable hits.

      The Hawks, who have had their backs against the wall the entire tournament, did not back down from a first set loss, taking the next two sets to go up 2-1. Even after going down 23-22 in the third set, the Hawks scored the final three points to grab the important third set and a 2-1 lead.

      CBC finished with an incredible run to the finals, winning back-to-back five-set matches on Friday and Saturday. The Hawks completed an emotional, adversity-filled season with a record of 30-4 and runners-up of the NWAC tournament.

      Shelbey Nichol and Grace Boeder each had a great match for the Roadrunners as they relied on their middle blockers for scoring. Nichol had 21 kills and seven total blocks while Boeder had 16 kills on 22 attacks for an outstanding .682 hitting percentage to go along with her four blocks. Tournament MVP Taya Manibusan, who earned the award for the second year in a row, had 12 kills and 26 digs. Savannah Hutchins had 43 assists and Graci Zanona had 22 digs.

      The Hawks relied once again on Hokulani Sagapolu, who had 17 kills and 15 digs with four blocks. Lucendy Perez had 11 kills. Abbey Bonnington finished with 23 digs and Josephine Thomson had 29 assists and 20 digs.

      All-Tournament Team

      MVP: Taya Manibusan, Linn-Benton

      1st Team
      Shelbey Nichol, Linn-Benton
      Graci Zanona, Linn-Benton
      Hokulani Sagapolu, Columbia Basin
      Abbey Bonnington, Columbia Basin
      Marin Mackey, Bellevue
      Abigail Neff, North Idaho

      2nd Team
      Eva Buford, Linn-Benton
      Josephine Thompson, Columbia Basin
      Kate Hansen, Bellevue
      Jessica Stires, North Idaho
      Bryn Batten, Skagit Valley
      Celia Hubbard, Lane

    • Roadrunners Advance to NWAC Volleyball Championship Match

      LAKEWOOD, Washington — The Linn-Benton Roadrunners took down the Bellevue Bulldogs 3-1 in their Final Four match at the NWAC Volleyball Championship on Saturday, Nov. 19. 

      Improving to 33-1 on the season, the Roadrunners advance to the Championship Match in the tournament where they will face Columbia Basin on Sunday, Nov. 20 at 3 p.m.

      THE MATCH 

      The Roadrunners won a competitive first set by a score of 25-18; it was tied at 15-15 before the Beaks began to pull away. This included five kills from Eva Buford and three kills from Taya Manibusan.

      The second set introduced some competitiveness into the match, which the Bulldogs took 25-22. Despite the team’s 15 kills, the Roadrunners committed 12 errors. While Buford recorded five kills, the Bulldogs were able to limit themselves to two errors. The Roadrunners would seek to regain their momentum in the third set.

      This proved to be true, as the Roadrunners prevailed 25-16, taking their performance to another level by reducing their errors from 12 to four and delivering another 10 kills.

      The fourth set proved much of the same as the Roadrunners closed out the match with a score of 25-15, propelled by 12 kills and only two errors. Manibusan added three service aces in the final four points to close out the match while Buford added four kills in the deciding set.

      BOX SCORE

      The Roadrunners improved on their previous performance in the tournament with 48 kills, including a team-leading 15 from Buford with seven service aces from Manibusan. Graci Zanona added a team-leading 27 digs to the team effort.

      UP NEXT

      The Roadrunners advance to NWAC Volleyball Championship Game against Columbia Basin on Sunday, November 20 at 3 p.m. Columbia Basic advanced with a 3-2 win over North Idaho.

      Linn-Benton moves onto the finals looking for back-to-back titles after winning for the first time in program history in 2021. 

    • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever — A Review

      “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” is the final film in Phase Four of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and the sequel to the 2018 runaway smash hit. As a sequel to one of the franchise’s most acclaimed standalone films, and a tribute to the late Chadwick Boseman (who succumbed to cancer in 2020 at age 43), it marks a worthy successor and one of the franchise’s best standalone films to date.

      The story takes place one year after the passing of King T’Challa. As the nation of Wakanda tries to forge a path forward and find a new heir to take up the mantle of Black Panther, a mysterious being known as Namor the Submariner (Tenoch Huerta, “Narcos”) emerges from the lost city of Atlantis to challenge the rule of the Earth’s surface. The story unfolds in a mammoth 161-minute epic that not only lives up to the hype, but provides a spectacular and touching template for future installments.

      Though following up a film as beloved and successful as the first “Black Panther” was never going to be an easy task, it became one that got even more challenging with the novel coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, along with the untimely death of Chadwick Boseman. Director Ryan Coogler, who has experience with both personal films such as “Fruitvale Station” and the spectacle of blockbuster filmmaking from his work on the previous film and the first “Creed” film in 2015; pays tribute to his late collaborator and friend while also making a thrilling globetrotting adventure. 

      The film marks the 30th main installment in the franchise, and shows just how far Marvel Studios has come since the release of the first “Iron Man.” On top of Namor being connected to the much-anticipated entry of the X-Men to the MCU, new characters such as Iron Heart (Dominque Thorne) are a standout. You see every bit of the film’s $250 million budget on the screen, from an opening fight on an offshore drilling rig to Namor’s kingdom in Atlantis to the moment when the new Black Panther is finally crowned to enter the battle.

      With a new record box office opening for Veteran’s Day weekend, “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” marks a fitting finale to Phase Four of the MCU, a worthy sequel to 2018’s “Black Panther,” and especially as a tribute to the late Chadwick Boseman. It’s an easy recommendation to end this phase of the franchise and as a template for what lies ahead.

      Directed by Ryan Coogler (Based on the graphic novel series by Marvel Comics)

      Starring: Letitia Wright, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Florence Kasumba, Michaela Coel and Martin Freeman with Tenoch Huerta and Dominque Thorne

      Rated PG-13

    • Roadrunners Move onto Final Four at NWAC Volleyball Playoffs

      Lakewood, Washington — The Linn-Benton Roadrunners defeated the Highline Thunderbirds 3-0 in their Elite 8 match at the NWAC Volleyball Championship on Friday, Nov. 18. 

      Improving to 32-1 on the season, the Roadrunners advance to the Final Four in the tournament where they will face Bellevue Community College on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 2 p.m.

      THE MATCH 

      The Roadrunners won the first set in commanding fashion with a score of 25-10, headlined by winning 14 of the first 15 points, including two kills from Shelbey Nichol. Linn-Benton capitalized on nine attack errors committed by the Thunderbirds in the first set.

      The Roadrunners continued their control throughout the second set, bursting out to a 19-6 lead before closing out the set with a score of 25-13. Nichol recorded four more kills to add to her total of 10 for the match, the most of any player. The Roadrunners earned another eight points from errors in the second set while recording 11kills.

      The third set proved to be most competitive, with the Thunderbirds taking an early 4-1 lead before the Roadrunners tied it up at 11-11. The Roadrunners would take the final lead at 14-13 with a kill from Tanya Manibusan with the team recording a match-high 18 kills in the third set. While the Thunderbirds played their best volleyball in the third set with 10 kills and only five errors, the Roadrunners proved victorious by a final score of 27-24 for a 3-0 sweep.

      BOX SCORE

      The Roadrunners stacked up 38 kills over the three sets to the Thunderbirds’ 22, while also serving up six aces over the three sets to the Thunderbirds’ one. Graci Zanona lead the Roadrunners with 17 digs while Eva Buford and Tanya Manibusan each added an additional seven kills to the team’s total. 

      UP NEXT

      The Roadrunners advance to a Final Four appearance against Bellevue on Saturday, Nov. 19.

    • Change Makers Event: Meet-and-Greet with Denise Hughes-Tafen

      Both the department of Human Development and Family Services and co-curricular Change Makers will be hosting a meet-and-greet in honor of the department’s newest instructor Denise Hughes-Tafen. The event will take place on Tuesday, November 22 from 9-9:50am in Forum 220, the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion office. Open to HDFS students, this informal gathering will be a great opportunity to meet staff and cohorts within the same area of study. Complimentary coffee, tea and treats will be provided, making this a tea party of academia not to be missed.

      If you have any questions or curiosities about HDFS or Change Makers, contact department chair Liz Pearce at pearcel@linnbenton.edu

      Image by Freepik

    • Wellness Wednesday: Great Expectations

      Charles Schulz, author/cartoonist of Peanuts said, “there is no heavier burden than a great potential.”

      Yep, expectations are fraught with thinking ‘what if ______ doesn’t turn out as I planned?!’

      Many of us start every term, every new year, with thoughts of ‘I’ve got this. I’m going to do _______ and be super successful.’ And then reality rears its ugly head, bringing us back to the mundane, plodding through day-to-day tasks and balancing all that we want to do.  

      My older sister (who is wiser than me, but I often don’t believe her) said, “You CAN have everything. Just not all at the same time.” I have found that to be helpful advice. If you’re holding a family together, working full-time on top of school, playing a competitive sport, commuting from afar, struggling for enough food, shelter or books every month, the priorities in front of you are not measured by grades. It’s about survival, improvement, moving forward, hanging in and hanging on. 

      So how do we apply this thinking in order to be successful term by term in school while carrying the burden of expectations? As with most things, I’m a middle-of-the-road kind of thinker, one who sees both sides of the equation. Which brings me to another favorite quote: 

      “Reach for the stars!  You might not catch one, but at least you won’t come up with a handful of mud!” — Author unknown

      It is important to have goals, short term objectives and also a view to the longer reach of where you want to be. If you have not gotten a “D” or “F” in a class in college, count yourself lucky. It happens. And it can feel oh so awful. The voices inside might say you’re dumb, stupid, unable to learn. I say poobah. It means you failed one class. Period. A year from now, five years from now, that’s not going to have much impact. When you go for a job interview, it is highly unlikely they will ask what grade you got in Trig, Econ, Bio or Communications (not picking on any one subject, really!).  

      Remember your strengths, your values and what matters to you at the end of the day when you look in the mirror. I’m not saying it’s easy, I’m just saying things are hard sometimes and the least we can do is be gentle with ourselves. We’re not waking up in the morning trying to mess up the day. We have plans, ideas, hopes, dreams and they are worthy of our energy. 

      “When you fall, get up one more time than you fall. Reach for help. Admit you’re not perfect. And keep going.  
      The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” — Lao Tzu

      Image by storyset on Freepik

    • 71st Annual Linn County Veteran’s Day Parade

      This year’s Veteran’s Day parade, which annually takes place in Albany, marked the first traditional parade of the observance since before the pandemic. After two years of attendance through “reverse” parades, — a creative solution to social distancing, where cars drive up to floats and displays — Downtown Albany, and the city itself, felt the resurgence of life as the town bundled up and showed up in order to remember, honor and respect our nation’s veterans.

  • Wellness Wednesday: Two Sides to Every Story

    ​Two sides of the same coin.  Two sides to every story.   

    Our strengths are often our weaknesses. When we are determined and stubborn and committed to follow through on a task, it is a strength. We rock! We can do it! When we continue on a path that is tearing us apart, wreaking havoc on our sleep or psyche, this may be a strength overplayed into a weakness – of not being able to stop, let go or find a new path.

    (Note: *This advising tale is not an exact story, more an amalgamation of several recent student stories. Details have been changed to protect their identity.)

    I was talking with a student (*Ann) yesterday who was struggling with Biology, and she was also really committed to pursuing a career in a health occupation. Ann and I have talked a few times and she was dedicated to good study habits – meeting with a tutor, doing academic coaching, using flashcards and participating in a study group. This last visit she was just bummed. She was less stressed this visit, and more resigned to the fact that this Bio course would not work out well.  

    Amidst the discussion of disappointment and “what now?” was her sheepish question of “can I change my major?” (As an advisor, I’m here to support you in meeting your goals, though yes, I’d like to see you graduate with a degree.) My reply was, “yes, you can, what are you thinking of…”

    This is when the conversation shifted away from the mindset of wondering how to not fail this specific class, and what if that does happen, what would that mean for this application and can this class be retaken, and started focusing on other thoughts; what about if I did ____? Are there any courses in _____ next term? I’ve always wanted to learn more about ___ !

    The air, the hope, the look in her eyes — it all changed. 

    This was all visible within 30 minutes, though likely she had had days and weeks of thought and worry. From disappointment in not achieving the first goal, to excitement in a new future possibility. Two sides of change.

    Image by storyset on Freepik

  • Civil Discourse Op-Ed: Gas-Powered Vehicles

    The Civil Discourse Program, facilitated by Communications professor Mark Urista, has yet again taken on a relevant and debatable issue: banning gas-powered vehicles. With California’s recent steps towards banning gas-powered vehicles, should Oregon follow suit? While it seems like an environmentally-conscious decision, how will the power grid be threatened? What would this mean for the working class? The Civil Discourse Program covers all the angles.

    Ban Gas-Powered Vehicles

    Authors: Cheyanne Rider, Eliana Ortega, and The Civil Discourse Program

    California recently passed a ban on the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035. Oregon and other states are considering following suit. This may seem like a drastic change in a short time period but it’s a necessary change. There are several benefits to making the switch to electric passenger vehicles.

    First, this policy will decrease pollution.  Fossil fuels are the biggest contributors to climate change.  This includes coal, oil, and gas that emit carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.  These gasses can cause a variety of health issues like heart attacks, respiratory disorders, stroke, asthma, and even death.  Gas-powered cars don’t just add to the burning of fossil fuels but also cause noise pollution.  We carry a normal conversation at 60 decibels (dB), but trucks and motorcycles can cause noise between 90-96 dB.  Any sound above 65 dB can cause an increase in blood pressure, heart rate, and stress hormones. This affects mental health and can cause cognitive problems.

    Second, this policy can reduce our dependence on foreign oil.  In 2021, the United States imported about 8.47 million barrels per day of petroleum from 73 countries. Our dependence on foreign oil has influenced foreign policy for generations. The war between Russia and Ukraine is only the most recent example of how our daily lives (and wallets) are impacted.  Since the war began, the US has blocked Russian imports of oil causing gas prices to rise. This has led President Biden to release oil from strategic reserves and consider lifting sanctions on Iran. These instances have led to bipartisan support for reducing our dependence on foreign oil. In today’s political climate, that kind of cooperation demonstrates how dire the situation really is.

    Common concerns about electric vehicles are their longevity and affordability.  Electric car batteries are designed to last as long as the car’s life span.  Many manufacturers offer warranties to replace a battery if needed.  Therefore, the battery should not be an issue.  Data also shows that electric cars are becoming less expensive.  There are many inventions in history whose costs have gone down with popularity.  VCR’s are a great example of an item that was extremely expensive when it first became available but the price continued to drop the more popular it became.  Charging stations are also easy to find.  Whether you prefer to use an app or do a quick Google search, anyone who needs a charge should be able to find one. 

    There are many reasons that we should switch to electric vehicles. They can mitigate a significant contributor to global warming, improve our health, and reduce our dependence on foreign energy. This would benefit our environment and have long-lasting benefits for future generations.  


    Don’t Ban Gas-Powered Vehicles

    Authors: Eagle Hunt, Jacob Pacheco, and The Civil Discourse Program

    Banning the sale of new gas-powered vehicles seems well-intentioned.  It will encourage more drivers to purchase Electric vehicles (EVs), lower carbon emissions, and help fight climate change.  In reality, this ban would harm our environment, threaten our power grid, and will negatively affect the working class. 

    EVs are attractive because they produce no carbon emissions.  However, there is one big question that needs to be answered: Where will we get our electricity to charge the EVs?  In California, a state that recently passed a rule that will ban the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035 and aims to issue a similar ban on the sale of new diesel trucks by 2040, 50% of their electricity comes from burning natural gases. Basic chemistry tells us that every time you convert one type of energy into another, you lose efficiency.  If we’re so concerned about the environment, why would we burn gas, convert it to electricity, charge a car, and drive the car, all to avoid putting gas directly into the car?  This process is far less efficient than what we’re currently doing.

    It is also worth looking at our power grid and seeing if it’s up for the challenge of charging a large number of EVs. CA’s power grid is barely sustaining current demand. The US power grid has been described as “aging and unstable.”  Consider how much stress the grid takes when wildfires and heat waves continue to damage outdated equipment.  Adding more EVs without updating our power system will cause it to crash.  Nobody benefits from that result.

    We also need to consider the impact this ban will have on truckers.  Diesel engines are the backbone of our supply chain, construction, farming, and first responder vehicles. A battery simply cannot compete with the durability, strength, and power a diesel engine can produce.  Before any bans on diesel vehicles take effect, we need to have proven, affordable, and accessible replacements ready to go.

    Finally, we must consider the costs of this ban.  New EVs cost about  $17,000 more than gas-powered vehicles.  This barrier is very difficult to overcome.  The average cost for a new gas-powered vehicle is already a lot to afford for working-class families.  When you factor in repairs, EVs can be very expensive to fix once they break down.  At a time when inflation is rampant and 60% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, creating higher costs for personal transportation is harmful and unwise.

    EVs are a remarkable technological advancement and offer many perks.  However, we should be careful about forcing drivers to be fully dependent on them.  A strict ban on gas-powered vehicles by 2035 and diesel trucks in 2040 will also increase costs for many people and presents a serious threat to our power grid.  Moreover, the current process of creating electricity is not carbon neutral.  The US, and Oregon in particular, should be wary of following in CA’s footsteps.

    Image by rawpixel.com on Freepik

  • Roadrunners Rally to Win Back-to-back NWAC Volleyball Championships

    LAKEWOOD, Washington — The Linn-Benton Volleyball team claimed its second-straight NWAC Volleyball Championship after a five-set victory over Columbia Basin in an incredible match on Sunday, Nov. 20, at Pierce College.

    After winning their first-ever NWAC title in 2021 led by head coach Jayme Frazier, the Roadrunners have now won back-to-back titles in dominant fashion. LBCC finished 2021 with a 32-2 record but managed to improve upon that with a 34-1 record in 2022.

    A rarity on the season, the Roadrunners went down 2-1 in the match due to the tough play of the Hawks. In set four, however, LBCC collected themselves to tie the score with 25-20 set win. In the fifth and final set, it was all Roadrunners as they went up 9-1, eventually finishing the thrilling match with a 15-5 set score.

    The Roadrunners took set one by a 25-15 score as their front row caught fire, recording five blocks with a number of unstoppable hits.

    The Hawks, who have had their backs against the wall the entire tournament, did not back down from a first set loss, taking the next two sets to go up 2-1. Even after going down 23-22 in the third set, the Hawks scored the final three points to grab the important third set and a 2-1 lead.

    CBC finished with an incredible run to the finals, winning back-to-back five-set matches on Friday and Saturday. The Hawks completed an emotional, adversity-filled season with a record of 30-4 and runners-up of the NWAC tournament.

    Shelbey Nichol and Grace Boeder each had a great match for the Roadrunners as they relied on their middle blockers for scoring. Nichol had 21 kills and seven total blocks while Boeder had 16 kills on 22 attacks for an outstanding .682 hitting percentage to go along with her four blocks. Tournament MVP Taya Manibusan, who earned the award for the second year in a row, had 12 kills and 26 digs. Savannah Hutchins had 43 assists and Graci Zanona had 22 digs.

    The Hawks relied once again on Hokulani Sagapolu, who had 17 kills and 15 digs with four blocks. Lucendy Perez had 11 kills. Abbey Bonnington finished with 23 digs and Josephine Thomson had 29 assists and 20 digs.

    All-Tournament Team

    MVP: Taya Manibusan, Linn-Benton

    1st Team
    Shelbey Nichol, Linn-Benton
    Graci Zanona, Linn-Benton
    Hokulani Sagapolu, Columbia Basin
    Abbey Bonnington, Columbia Basin
    Marin Mackey, Bellevue
    Abigail Neff, North Idaho

    2nd Team
    Eva Buford, Linn-Benton
    Josephine Thompson, Columbia Basin
    Kate Hansen, Bellevue
    Jessica Stires, North Idaho
    Bryn Batten, Skagit Valley
    Celia Hubbard, Lane

  • Roadrunners Advance to NWAC Volleyball Championship Match

    LAKEWOOD, Washington — The Linn-Benton Roadrunners took down the Bellevue Bulldogs 3-1 in their Final Four match at the NWAC Volleyball Championship on Saturday, Nov. 19. 

    Improving to 33-1 on the season, the Roadrunners advance to the Championship Match in the tournament where they will face Columbia Basin on Sunday, Nov. 20 at 3 p.m.

    THE MATCH 

    The Roadrunners won a competitive first set by a score of 25-18; it was tied at 15-15 before the Beaks began to pull away. This included five kills from Eva Buford and three kills from Taya Manibusan.

    The second set introduced some competitiveness into the match, which the Bulldogs took 25-22. Despite the team’s 15 kills, the Roadrunners committed 12 errors. While Buford recorded five kills, the Bulldogs were able to limit themselves to two errors. The Roadrunners would seek to regain their momentum in the third set.

    This proved to be true, as the Roadrunners prevailed 25-16, taking their performance to another level by reducing their errors from 12 to four and delivering another 10 kills.

    The fourth set proved much of the same as the Roadrunners closed out the match with a score of 25-15, propelled by 12 kills and only two errors. Manibusan added three service aces in the final four points to close out the match while Buford added four kills in the deciding set.

    BOX SCORE

    The Roadrunners improved on their previous performance in the tournament with 48 kills, including a team-leading 15 from Buford with seven service aces from Manibusan. Graci Zanona added a team-leading 27 digs to the team effort.

    UP NEXT

    The Roadrunners advance to NWAC Volleyball Championship Game against Columbia Basin on Sunday, November 20 at 3 p.m. Columbia Basic advanced with a 3-2 win over North Idaho.

    Linn-Benton moves onto the finals looking for back-to-back titles after winning for the first time in program history in 2021. 

  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever — A Review

    “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” is the final film in Phase Four of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and the sequel to the 2018 runaway smash hit. As a sequel to one of the franchise’s most acclaimed standalone films, and a tribute to the late Chadwick Boseman (who succumbed to cancer in 2020 at age 43), it marks a worthy successor and one of the franchise’s best standalone films to date.

    The story takes place one year after the passing of King T’Challa. As the nation of Wakanda tries to forge a path forward and find a new heir to take up the mantle of Black Panther, a mysterious being known as Namor the Submariner (Tenoch Huerta, “Narcos”) emerges from the lost city of Atlantis to challenge the rule of the Earth’s surface. The story unfolds in a mammoth 161-minute epic that not only lives up to the hype, but provides a spectacular and touching template for future installments.

    Though following up a film as beloved and successful as the first “Black Panther” was never going to be an easy task, it became one that got even more challenging with the novel coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, along with the untimely death of Chadwick Boseman. Director Ryan Coogler, who has experience with both personal films such as “Fruitvale Station” and the spectacle of blockbuster filmmaking from his work on the previous film and the first “Creed” film in 2015; pays tribute to his late collaborator and friend while also making a thrilling globetrotting adventure. 

    The film marks the 30th main installment in the franchise, and shows just how far Marvel Studios has come since the release of the first “Iron Man.” On top of Namor being connected to the much-anticipated entry of the X-Men to the MCU, new characters such as Iron Heart (Dominque Thorne) are a standout. You see every bit of the film’s $250 million budget on the screen, from an opening fight on an offshore drilling rig to Namor’s kingdom in Atlantis to the moment when the new Black Panther is finally crowned to enter the battle.

    With a new record box office opening for Veteran’s Day weekend, “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” marks a fitting finale to Phase Four of the MCU, a worthy sequel to 2018’s “Black Panther,” and especially as a tribute to the late Chadwick Boseman. It’s an easy recommendation to end this phase of the franchise and as a template for what lies ahead.

    Directed by Ryan Coogler (Based on the graphic novel series by Marvel Comics)

    Starring: Letitia Wright, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Florence Kasumba, Michaela Coel and Martin Freeman with Tenoch Huerta and Dominque Thorne

    Rated PG-13

  • Roadrunners Move onto Final Four at NWAC Volleyball Playoffs

    Lakewood, Washington — The Linn-Benton Roadrunners defeated the Highline Thunderbirds 3-0 in their Elite 8 match at the NWAC Volleyball Championship on Friday, Nov. 18. 

    Improving to 32-1 on the season, the Roadrunners advance to the Final Four in the tournament where they will face Bellevue Community College on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 2 p.m.

    THE MATCH 

    The Roadrunners won the first set in commanding fashion with a score of 25-10, headlined by winning 14 of the first 15 points, including two kills from Shelbey Nichol. Linn-Benton capitalized on nine attack errors committed by the Thunderbirds in the first set.

    The Roadrunners continued their control throughout the second set, bursting out to a 19-6 lead before closing out the set with a score of 25-13. Nichol recorded four more kills to add to her total of 10 for the match, the most of any player. The Roadrunners earned another eight points from errors in the second set while recording 11kills.

    The third set proved to be most competitive, with the Thunderbirds taking an early 4-1 lead before the Roadrunners tied it up at 11-11. The Roadrunners would take the final lead at 14-13 with a kill from Tanya Manibusan with the team recording a match-high 18 kills in the third set. While the Thunderbirds played their best volleyball in the third set with 10 kills and only five errors, the Roadrunners proved victorious by a final score of 27-24 for a 3-0 sweep.

    BOX SCORE

    The Roadrunners stacked up 38 kills over the three sets to the Thunderbirds’ 22, while also serving up six aces over the three sets to the Thunderbirds’ one. Graci Zanona lead the Roadrunners with 17 digs while Eva Buford and Tanya Manibusan each added an additional seven kills to the team’s total. 

    UP NEXT

    The Roadrunners advance to a Final Four appearance against Bellevue on Saturday, Nov. 19.

  • Change Makers Event: Meet-and-Greet with Denise Hughes-Tafen

    Both the department of Human Development and Family Services and co-curricular Change Makers will be hosting a meet-and-greet in honor of the department’s newest instructor Denise Hughes-Tafen. The event will take place on Tuesday, November 22 from 9-9:50am in Forum 220, the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion office. Open to HDFS students, this informal gathering will be a great opportunity to meet staff and cohorts within the same area of study. Complimentary coffee, tea and treats will be provided, making this a tea party of academia not to be missed.

    If you have any questions or curiosities about HDFS or Change Makers, contact department chair Liz Pearce at pearcel@linnbenton.edu

    Image by Freepik

  • Wellness Wednesday: Great Expectations

    Charles Schulz, author/cartoonist of Peanuts said, “there is no heavier burden than a great potential.”

    Yep, expectations are fraught with thinking ‘what if ______ doesn’t turn out as I planned?!’

    Many of us start every term, every new year, with thoughts of ‘I’ve got this. I’m going to do _______ and be super successful.’ And then reality rears its ugly head, bringing us back to the mundane, plodding through day-to-day tasks and balancing all that we want to do.  

    My older sister (who is wiser than me, but I often don’t believe her) said, “You CAN have everything. Just not all at the same time.” I have found that to be helpful advice. If you’re holding a family together, working full-time on top of school, playing a competitive sport, commuting from afar, struggling for enough food, shelter or books every month, the priorities in front of you are not measured by grades. It’s about survival, improvement, moving forward, hanging in and hanging on. 

    So how do we apply this thinking in order to be successful term by term in school while carrying the burden of expectations? As with most things, I’m a middle-of-the-road kind of thinker, one who sees both sides of the equation. Which brings me to another favorite quote: 

    “Reach for the stars!  You might not catch one, but at least you won’t come up with a handful of mud!” — Author unknown

    It is important to have goals, short term objectives and also a view to the longer reach of where you want to be. If you have not gotten a “D” or “F” in a class in college, count yourself lucky. It happens. And it can feel oh so awful. The voices inside might say you’re dumb, stupid, unable to learn. I say poobah. It means you failed one class. Period. A year from now, five years from now, that’s not going to have much impact. When you go for a job interview, it is highly unlikely they will ask what grade you got in Trig, Econ, Bio or Communications (not picking on any one subject, really!).  

    Remember your strengths, your values and what matters to you at the end of the day when you look in the mirror. I’m not saying it’s easy, I’m just saying things are hard sometimes and the least we can do is be gentle with ourselves. We’re not waking up in the morning trying to mess up the day. We have plans, ideas, hopes, dreams and they are worthy of our energy. 

    “When you fall, get up one more time than you fall. Reach for help. Admit you’re not perfect. And keep going.  
    The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” — Lao Tzu

    Image by storyset on Freepik

  • 71st Annual Linn County Veteran’s Day Parade

    This year’s Veteran’s Day parade, which annually takes place in Albany, marked the first traditional parade of the observance since before the pandemic. After two years of attendance through “reverse” parades, — a creative solution to social distancing, where cars drive up to floats and displays — Downtown Albany, and the city itself, felt the resurgence of life as the town bundled up and showed up in order to remember, honor and respect our nation’s veterans.

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