Resignation leaves empty vice presidency in the Student Leadership Council

LBCC’s Student Leadership Council (SLC) has lost elected member John Maine after an early resignation from his vice presidency.

John Maine stepped down from his position as vice president of LBCC's Student Leadership Council.

John Maine stepped down from his position as vice president of LBCC’s Student Leadership Council.

“This was a difficult decision, but, due to reasons out of my control, it was what I had to do,” said Maine.

He was elected in February to serve as VP during the 2016-17 school year, following in the footsteps of previous VP Eric Slyter.

“My perspective has not changed on filling obligations that you have committed to, but there are circumstances that change and individual’s priorities and you must accept the decision you have to make,” said Maine.

His resignation comes swiftly after a tumultuous 2015-16 school year for the SLC, when student leadership faced the resignations of both elected presidential positions early in the year.  

Maine did not specify the reasons for his departure from the SLC despite this earlier statement at the Feb. 12 election debate with opponent Jason Shirley.

“We need to have a strong Student Leadership Council that can pick up and fix this, and not have it happen again, or have a plan if something drastic does happen,” said Maine, referring to the double-resignation of SLC leaders.

In 2015, the SLC’s currently elected president Slyter stepped into the position of vice president as former Vice President Candalynn Johnson took the presidency after the resignation of President Paola Gonzalez.

Johnson had previously taken the vice presidency just one month prior after the resignation of the elected vice president.

“They [student leaders] really stepped in and we ended the year on I think a high note, ” said Greg Hamann, president of LBCC. “Eric’s [Slyter] going to be great as president, he’s a bright and dedicated man.”

Despite another early resignation, Slyter remains confident in the SLC’s effectiveness and ability to lead the student body of LBCC.

“I feel really positive about the leadership team and I don’t think we’re going to see the same sort of instability this year that we did last year,” said Hamann.

After Maine’s resignation, Slyter alerted other student leaders to the open VP position. According to the SLC bylaws, a nominated student leader can take the vice presidency by a two-thirds vote.

According to Slyter, the most likely nominee is Kevin Yusif Peña Aceves, an international student ambassador from Mexico and an event planner for the SLC. One other student showed interest but is unable to move forward in pursuit of the position.  

“I really do believe that Kevin [Aceves] is our best option,” said Slyter.

Aceves intends to mend the lack of inclusiveness for international students within the student leadership and the campus community.

“Just opening the doors for more international students, have them feel like they are a part of the school. Sometimes I feel like the international students get segregated,” said Aceves.

Beginning as an undocumented immigrant in the U.S., Aceves journeyed for his own education, seeking opportunity elsewhere. He returned to Mexico, where Aceves says he gained experienced working in Jalisco, Mexico as a photographer and second assistant to the governor. He is currently working on an associate degree in business administration at LBCC and intends to continue with his education.

“This has been my dream ever since I graduated high school now that I have an opportunity to  actually do what I want to do,” said Aceves. “I want to get everything out of it, the full college experience, being part of leadership and giving back to the student body as much as I possibly can.”

According to Slyter, Aceves is an avid student leader.

“We’ve really laid the groundwork for him to do well in the VP position,” said Slyter.

Check the October editions of The Commuter for Aceves’ full story and the results of the final nomination for vice president of the SLC.

Story and photo by Emily Goodykoontz

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